Building a family business with your support

Building a family business with your support

Antonio and Rosalva wanted one thing: to create a better life for their daughters. But as immigrants with little formal education and limited English skills, it was hard to financially support their family and still have time to spend with their girls.

Antonio worked long hours in farm fields and nurseries, sometimes as many as 16 hours a day. 

They knew they needed a change. And Antonio had an idea. 

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Hotdogs and haircuts at our Forest Grove Farmers Market

Hotdogs and haircuts at our Forest Grove Farmers Market

Audaddy’s hotdog cart has only grown in popularity since 2014, when owners Ryan and Crystal Audett first started selling at our Forest Grove Farmers Market.

The couple’s love for the community shines as both of their small businesses grow.  Along with owning Audaddy’s, Crystal Audett owns the local hair salon, A Door to Bliss.

“We like to say we do hotdogs and haircuts because often people will come up to the hotdog cart to make a hair appointment,” said Crystal Audett.

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Great British Bakery lends U.K. flair to our Forest Grove Farmers Market

Great British Bakery lends U.K. flair to our Forest Grove Farmers Market

Pink cakes topped with strawberries, heart-shaped shortbread tarts and carefully adorned cupcakes are just some of the treats to choose from when you stop by Great British Bakery’s booth at our Forest Grove Farmers Market.

For Tash Lieb — the baker, brains and beauty behind Great British Bakery — creating sweet treats in the kitchen comes naturally. 

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A prescription for produce: How you helped Juana turn her health around

A prescription for produce: How you helped Juana turn her health around

Juana Estrada was in pain. It was hard to keep up with her young children when her stomach hurt day after day. And she was struggling with anxiety as well.

Every day, Juana would shop and cook for her family. Their diet consisted of typical meals such as tortillas, pizza, and hamburgers. But after every meal, her stomach hurt even worse.

 

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Marcella Kriebel shares her art with our Forest Grove Farmers Market

Marcella Kriebel shares her art with our Forest Grove Farmers Market

Juicy bright red tomatoes, vibrant green and orange peppers, and leafy cilantro are just some of the subjects that cooking enthusiast Marcella Kriebel brings to life with her watercolor illustrations.

Kriebel, a Forest Grove native who now resides in Washington D.C., developed a deep connection with Latin American food and culture through her travels. She now focuses her art on the unique ingredients and tasty recipes from the region. 

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Mountainside Herbal's Secret Garden at the Forest Grove Farmers Market

Mountainside Herbal's Secret Garden at the Forest Grove Farmers Market

When you visit Mountainside Herbal Nursery’s booth at our Forest Grove Farmers Market it’s like stepping into a secret garden. Handmade shelves crammed full of unique varieties of vegetable starts, herbs and berries make it look like a farm popped up in the middle of Main Street on Wednesday evenings.

But for owner Krista Olsen Rahf, farming isn’t a secret. It has been a family enterprise for decades.

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Adelante Mujeres supports students as they stand up against racism in school

Adelante Mujeres supports students as they stand up against racism in school

In light of ongoing and recent incidents of racism at Forest Grove High School, a large group of students and their supporters staged a walkout yesterday to confront school administration and ask that their concerns be addressed.  We commend the students on their peaceful and organized protest, in which both students and administrators were given the opportunity to address the crowd that gathered at the district offices.

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Your support helped Hortensia turn childhood trauma into a teaching career

Your support helped Hortensia turn childhood trauma into a teaching career

My name is Hortensia Mandujano and I want you to know how grateful I am to be here. I'm here because you support Adelante Mujeres. 

I've made a lot of changes in my life. And you made some of those changes possible. Because of you, I have the courage to be here this evening to tell you my story.

I come from a very large family. I'm the youngest of 12 kids. I don't remember much about my childhood, but I do remember the day my mother died.

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Diversity Flourishes at the Forest Grove Farmers Market

It is National Farmers Market Week and we are highlighting some of the vendors you can find at the Forest Grove Farmers Market

Please support the Forest Grove Farmers Market! Stop by for your fresh produce and to chat, donate, or sign up to volunteer.  

On any given Wednesday between May and October, you can find the Forest Grove Farmers Market bustling with activity from people of all walks of life. Diversity intersects and connects on Main Street from 4pm-8pm and as Kaely Summers, the FGFM Manager, says, “People come to shop, but they stay to connect and socialize.”

The Market has grown to become the biggest regular community event in Forest Grove and we strive to make our market accessible to everyone. We offer matching programs for SNAP, WIC, and FDNP shoppers and we offer many cross-cultural opportunities, such as our Produce Prescription program, an Adelante Mujeres and Virginia García Memorial Health Center partnered program.

Our Market features and celebrates the rich diversity of vendors that come to sell their fruits, veggies, and artisan food products every Wednesday. Shoppers not only get a variety of different products to choose from, but they also receive a brief lesson about the food they’re buying.

In celebration of National Farmers Market Week, we want to honor just a few of our amazing vendors and the unique products they sell.

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Little Potato Cucumber from Stone Boat Farm:

On his farm in Glendale, OR, Jesse Nichols grows these small vegetables that look a little intimidating on the outside due to their brown and scaly-skin, slightly resembling a miniature cantaloupe. However, once you cut into and taste them, you’ll see that they’re bright green, juicy, and taste like any fresh cucumber with an added zesty lemon flavor.

Jesse showing off this variety of exotic cucumber.

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Pipicha from N & N Amaro Produce:

Nicolas and Norma Amaro, who are originally from Tlaxcala, Mexico and practice sustainable farming in Forest Grove, grow produce

such as pipicha. Pipicha is an herb that Nicolas says, “grows like a weed in the mountains,” close to where the Amaros lived in Mexico. The flavor is similar to that of cilantro, with tones of pine, citrus, and mint. Pipicha contains antioxidants, vitamins B and C, phosphorus, calcium, iron, and has been used to treat inflammatory diseases.

The Uto-Aztec people used Pipicha to cleanse the liver and to fight bacterial infections.

Nicolas bunching some pipicha together.

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Asian Squash Stems from GX Family Garden:

Chue Cha hails from Laos and she sells beautiful flower bouquets at the Market. In addition to flowers, she sells Asian squash stems. Who knew you could eat squash stems? She says that she peels the spines from squash stems and cooks them in a soup with other delectable ingredients like pork and mushrooms. Add the stems and leaves from squash, zucchini, or pumpkin plants to your next meal in order to get your greens from a unique source.

Chue explaining how she uses the stems in homemade soups.

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Biberli from Sweetrock Farm :

Diane Vireday’s sweet treats are inspired by her Swiss family heritage. Her father lived in a city called Lausanne, Switzerland and her mother lived in Aargau. Biberli is a gingerbread cookie made with marzipan (almond paste) and is her best-seller because its flavors are complex, long-lasting, and remind customers of Christmas. The cookie was coined Biberli because it looks like a beaver tail and biber means beaver in Swiss-German. Interestingly, the cookies are baked with completely moisture-free ingredients besides honey.  

Diane showcasing this delicious gingerbread cookie. 

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By Carrie Skuzeski and Annemarie García

Forest Grove Farmers Market heads to Square Peg Farm


This season, the Forest Grove Farmers Market, a program of Adelante Mujeres, is heading out into the fields to learn more about the farms and farmers who bring us the delicious produce every Wednesday from 4-8pm on Main Street in Forest Grove. Make sure to follow us on Facebook to see all of the beautiful photos and adventures we embark on!


This week we visited Square Peg Farm, where growing the freshest foods from organic-only practices is their #1 priority. Farmers Amy Benson and Chris Roehm run the farm and we chatted with them about their backgrounds, their passion for organic farming, and their beautiful and challenging farm.

In 2003, Amy, a native Wisconsinite, started 40 acre Square Peg Farm in Forest Grove. It soon became more work than she could handle alone, so she put the word out that she was looking for another farmer to help. Enter Chris, a native Pennsylvanian interested in learning more about agriculture after having become a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) member of a different farm. The rest is history, rich with certified organic produce and more!

Amy Benson and Chris Roehm
The couple grows a variety of certified organic vegetables and fruits ranging from squash and cabbage to currants and pears. Amy used to run a CSA program; however, nowadays Square Peg sells only at farmers’ markets and directly to chefs in Portland. On the farm, we found a few four-legged friends including "Spot," the dog, who was attempting to catch some critters during our visit. As we continued our exploration, we learned that, for a long time, Amy followed a vegetarian diet, which meant they didn’t raise animals on the farm. Over the years, though, Chris started raising chickens, then pigs, and now they’ve decided to take on the challenge of two steers. The animals help fertilize the land as well as provide sustainably raised meat for customers. Amy and Chris rotate their annual vegetable crops with cover crops such as millet and buckwheat grains, which also help feed the animals -- completing the cycle of maintaining nutritious soils.

Amy and Kaely, FGFM Manager, say hello
to some four-legged friends.
As if they weren't busy enough caring for their crops and animals, certain wildlife populations keep Chris and Amy even busier defending their harvests' safety. Nutria reside in the pond that borders the farm and sometimes sneak into their fields to steal a few ears of corn or other treats. The gophers go crazy for apple tree roots, which they find particularly scrumptious--an enthusiasm that neither the trees nor Chris and Amy share. After visiting Square Peg farm, these nuisances seem to pale in comparison to the stunning view of Mt. Hood standing just beyond their fields and the fresh air blowing sweetly around us. And, it all just seems worth the challenge for the duo to provide fresh food to their community. 


Pictures and story by: Carrie Skuzeski, FGFM Summer Intern
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Check out what Square Peg Farm has to offer this Wednesday at the Forest Grove Farmers Market and visit their website to learn more.




This is written by Ali Brown who shares her thoughts about working for us! Check out Ali's blog at Protecting your Mission


 Thoughts from Ali Brown!

 Monday, October 15, 2012


The Power of We- The Creation and Growth of a Mission through Collaboration


Today is Blog Action Day. This event is an opportunity to bring bloggers from all over the world together to blog about a similar topic. This years’ topic is the Power of We. Progressive thinkers all over will be posting about the power of collaboration and working hand in hand. This year’s topic serves as a wonderful starting point for our exploration of protecting your mission. Although there are many things that non-profit organizations can do to protect their mission, working in collaboration with others is fundamental. In order to see the Power of We first hand I am going to introduce you to the organization Adelante Mujeres, where I worked for from 2008-2012.
Adelante Mujeres is a non-profit organization in Forest Grove, Oregon (about 30 miles west of Portland) that works towards the education and empower of Latina women and their families. The organization was built through strong partnerships and continues to grow and thrive thanks to these connections. The organization’s connections with the community are countless but two programs stick out; Adelante Empresas and Forest Grove Farmers Market.

Adelante Empresas

Adelante Empresas, Adelante Mujeres’ small business training program, provides trainings and individualized support to 100 Latino small business owners every year, all with only two staff members. This sort of impact is only possible thanks to the Power of We.  Empresas staff works directly with the local Chambers of Commerce, the Forest Grove Economic Develop Department, local volunteers and the growing number of participating small business owners to continue to build a strong network of Latino owned small businesses. Bringing together each of these institutions and allowing them do what they do best has allowed for participating entrepreneurs to receive the support that they need, and for each of these organizations to work towards their specific missions. The local volunteers do not have to write grants or teach classes and Adelante Mujeres does not have to facilitate regional networking events. This collaboration has also brought together business leaders in the region and allowed for the development of new services and initiatives to better serve and advocate for all business owners. Empresas shows how the Power of We allows for the development and maintenance of a strong program within non-profit organizations and also provides the space for future collaboration.

The Forest Grove Farmers Market

The Forest Grove Farmers Market, a weekly seasonal market, is managed by Adelante Mujeres and has created strong partnerships in order to develop and work towards its mission. The farmers market has transformed from a place to buy and sell locally grown and produced goods into an accessible community-gathering place. The market partners with the downtown association, schools, universities, local banks and hospitals and other community groups to provide additional services to community members such as matching dollars for individuals using federal benefits such as SNAP and WIC, weekly kids activities and monthly expanded markets. These partnerships make the Forest Grove Farmers Market unique and have transformed it into a cornerstone of the community.

An Inclusive Definition of the Power of We  

Traditionally partnerships in the non-profit sector are directly between organizations or between organizations and community volunteers. As seen above Adelante has created many of these partnerships but is also working to redefine who is an essential partner. One way in which Adelante Mujeres truly exemplifies the Power of We is the organization’s relationship with program participants and its responsiveness to their needs and concerns. The organizational mission and the scope of its programs are constantly being shaped and improved by the needs and input of participants, giving a voice to a population that is often silenced. Adelante is a model of an organization that has defined the Power of We broadly and has used this power to grow and protect a powerful mission.

Adelante Mujeres
To learn more about Adelante Mujeres please check out their website at www.adelantemujeres.org.


I have been lucky enough to work within and learn from this organization but I know it is not the only way to do this good work. What organizations model this behavior in your world? How do they define the Power of We? How do they harness it? How can we continue to make the Power of We more inclusive to continue growing and learning?

Thank you, Ali for writing such a great blog about us!